News

08.04.2011 - A stamp for Japan!
It is hardly necessary to emphasize the enormous calamity that has struck large parts of the Japanese population. When looking at the daily events in Japan, taking in the grief that a cruel tsunami

It is hardly necessary to emphasize the enormous calamity that has struck large parts of the Japanese population. When looking at the daily events in Japan, taking in the grief that a cruel tsunami has caused and when realizing the horrendous consequences that nuclear pollution may have, we can only express our compassion with the countless victims of this ongoing tragedy, as well as with all those people who are still trying to fulfill the almost impossible task of making an end to the disastrous events of the past weeks. The unforeseen consequences of the tragedy that has been unfolding before our very eyes - and still continues to do so - we can still not assess in full.

We will, now and in future, have to deal with the infinite loss and sorrow that the catastrophe has brought upon hundreds of thousands of people and which will have an impact on the population of the tormented country Japan.

The AIJP therefore fully supports the request that a professional philatelist from Wiesbaden, Torsten Hornung, has addressed to philatelic associations and postal administrations all over the world: to use the medium of the postage stamp as a means for delivering a sign of hope. The AIJP welcomes his proposal to issue postage stamps with a surcharge, the proceeds of which should be used for the Japanese victims of the disaster, thus relaying a clear message of hope, compassion and human solidarity.

To this end, the AIJP has sent a letter to the Universal Postal Union in Bern in which the AIJP recommends that the UPU supports the aforementioned idea and that it will address the United Nations to realize the suggestion of one or more cross-border stamp issues. Millions of stamp collectors around the world will without doubt be prepared to make a modest donation for this cause. The only thing required is that many people make an effort, with the result that at least some of the concerns of the Japanese people – however small they may be – can and will be resolved.

Wolfgang Maassen
President of the AIJP